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P-ISSN: 2349-8528, E-ISSN: 2321-4902   |   Impact Factor: GIF: 0.565 NAAS Rating: 5.31 NEW

International Journal of Chemical Studies

Vol. 5, Issue 2 (2017)
Toward optimal soil organic carbon sequestration with effects of agricultural management practices and climate change in upland soils of subtropical India: A review


Author(s): RK Naresh, RK Gupta, PS Minhas, RS Rathore, Ashish Dwivedi, Mukesh Kumar, Saurabh Tyagi, Vineet Kumar, Lalit Kumar Rolaniya, Purushottam, Yogesh Kumar, Nihal Chandra Mahajan, Ankit Kumar, Bhanu Pratap and Onkar Singh

Abstract: Soil degradation, caused by land misuse and soil mismanagement, has plagued humanity since the dawn of settled agriculture. An understanding of the dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) as affected by agricultural management practices is imperative for maintaining soil productivity and mitigating global warming. Resource-poor and small-size land-holders can neither afford the expensive input nor are they sure of their effectiveness because of degraded soils and the harsh, changing climate. Consequently, crop yields are adversely impacted by accelerated erosion, and depletion of soil organic matter (SOM) and nutrients because of the extractive farming practices. The carbon (C) sequestration is a cost-effective strategy to mitigate climate change during the first few decades of the 21st century. There are five global C pools, and the third largest pool exists in soil and is estimated at 2.5 trillion tons (1-m depth). The conversion of natural ecosystems to agricultural ecosystems disturbs the soil ecological balance, soil processes, organic C, and biotic C pools. Globally, agricultural soils are estimated to potentially sequester 0.4–0.8 Pg C yr−1 by the adoption of recommended management practices on croplands, 0.01–0.03 Pg C yr−1 on irrigated soils, and 0.01–0.3 Pg C yr−1 on grasslands. Globally, there is a C crisis in soil especially in subtropical ecosystems because of increased carbon dioxide emissions from soil.

Pages: 433-442  |  581 Views  16 Downloads

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How to cite this article:
RK Naresh, RK Gupta, PS Minhas, RS Rathore, Ashish Dwivedi, Mukesh Kumar, Saurabh Tyagi, Vineet Kumar, Lalit Kumar Rolaniya, Purushottam, Yogesh Kumar, Nihal Chandra Mahajan, Ankit Kumar, Bhanu Pratap, Onkar Singh. Toward optimal soil organic carbon sequestration with effects of agricultural management practices and climate change in upland soils of subtropical India: A review. Int J Chem Stud 2017;5(2):433-442.
International Journal of Chemical Studies